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Aging Out: Tragic Numbers…And Real Hope

For youth who “age out” of care, statistics predict a heartbreaking road ahead. Their likehood of experiencing virtually any ill known to humanity is dramatically higher than for their peers who have families. This includes everything from homelessness, unemployment, and incarceration to physical illness and loneliness. Along with a host of other challenges, young adults […]


An All-Too-Rare Example of Contention Moving Toward Consensus

The current Christianity Today spotlights the ongoing shift in orphan care today – from orphanage-centered programs toward solutions that enable care within families. The title reads, “Why Christians are Abandoning the Orphanage.” As with so many debates today, this topic can quickly devolve into animosity among warring camps. On the one hand, it’s not entirely […]


Lumos Report on Orphanages in Haiti

Lumos – an organization founded by author JK Rowling to advocate against institutional care and for family-based care for children – released an important report today on orphanages in Haiti. The report, titled “Funding Haiti’s Orphanages at the Cost of Children’s Rights,” documents a number of highly significant findings. These include: Immense private giving. International […]


5 Big Takeaways from CAFO2017

CAFO2017 was unforgettable.  As we’re hearing from so many people now back “on mission” across the US and around the world, five big themes keep popping up.  They struck a deep chord in many hearts.  I pray they’ll continue to shape us all over the year ahead. 1) God uses brokenness to create beauty. “Dust […]


A Game Changer: Social Enterprise

Words like “sustainability” and “social enterprise” are all the rage in some circles, but they often prove easier to talk than do. And for many nonprofits, creating a profit-generating enterprise just may not make sense. But when it is done well, social enterprise can be a game changer. Want to know what that can look […]


Justice and the Inner Life

“I’m just not sure I can keep going,” he said. He and his wife had moved to Africa to serve in their mid-20s, eyes bright. But after nearly a decade of high highs and low lows, the disappointments seemed to dwarf the progress. “I feel like I’m done.” I’ve heard similar words from adoptive moms […]