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Building Local Capacity through Short Term Missions

It’s mid-summer in the US, and that means hundreds, if not thousands, of Christians are departing and returning from short-term missions around the world. Many of these teams visit orphans in developing nations, conduct Vacation Bible Schools, assist with building projects, and share the love of Christ with everyone they come to meet. For many […]


Happy Independence Day! Or is it?

Throughout their young lives, we prepare our children for independence. From a young age, we teach them to be careful around strangers, look both ways before crossing the street, and eat their vegetables. As they enter school-age, we praise their accomplishments and stick with them through their challenges, and attend their games, recitals and plays. […]


Protecting Children in Media

There I was, mouth hanging awkwardly open, on the Facebook page of a person I’d only met a time or two. I know most pictures are considered public domain these days, and it wasn’t a big deal. But still, I couldn’t help feeling a bit like a fresh ham plopped without consent in the butcher […]


WWO Global Forum (and great short video!)

The World Without Orphans Global Forum in Chiang Mai, Thailand this past week was nothing short of marvelous. It stands as yet another poignant emblem of the global re-awakening of the Church into the role that Christians at their best have always played on behalf of orphans. The 450+ attendees represented nearly all of the […]


The Super Bowl and “the Supersex Myth”

Last week, the cover of a magazine jumped at me from an airport news stand.  It was an attack on anti-human trafficking advocates.  What?  I nearly rubbed my eyes.  That’s like attacking Captain America or Buzz Lightyear.   But reading the attack gave me much to ponder, and I couldn’t help sketching out those reflections in […]


 Moving Photos from Nepal that Reveal Much

When Westerners view the wider world through their TVs and computer screens, they often see little more than images of need. It’s civil war and tsunami, poverty and famine. (The notable exceptions to this tend to be images of natural beauty.)  Perhaps that’s unavoidable. Sensationalism and struggle are always far more likely to be recounted […]